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History Overview

The London parishes - continued

St John the Evangelist, Friday Street

The centre-point of the parish of St John Friday Street lay at the intersection of Watling Street and Friday Street. Watling Street ran (and still runs) in an east-west direction; Friday Street ran north-south but the great bulk of Friday Street has now been built over. (A small section of Friday Street remains well to the south of the parish, coming north from Queen Victoria Street into Cannon Street). The parish of St John the Evangelist, Friday Street, was joined to All Hallows Bread Street after the Great Fire of 1666.

All Hallows, Bread Street
All Hallows Bread Street lay to the south-west of the parish of St Mary-le-Bow, with Watling Street running east-west through the parish and Bread Street running north-south. The bulk of the parish lay north of the Watling Street axis while the church itself stood on the south-east corner of the Watling Street / Bread Street intersection. It was surrounded by 8 other parishes. St John’s was amalgamated with All Hallows after the Great Fire. The parish of All Hallows Bread Street was joined to St Mary-le-Bow in 1876 when the Wren church of All Hallows was demolished to build warehouses

St Margaret Moyses, Friday Street
Both St Margaret Moyses Friday Street and St Mildred Bread Street (to which St Margaret’s was joined after 1666) lay along the 'southern strip' of parishes which later came together in the consolidated post-war parish of St Mary-le-Bow. The current-day Cannon Street marks the east-west axis of what was once the parish of St Margaret Moyses. Friday Street at one time ran north-south through the parish but the northern end of Friday Street has now disappeared (it is covered over by offices) and only the southern rump of a street which once stretched as far north as Cheapside still remains today. The church itself was located on the north side of Cannon Street, mid-way between Friday Street and Bread Street. The parish of St Margaret Moyses Friday Street, was joined to St Mildred Bread Street after the Great Fire of 1666.

St Mildred, Bread Street
St Mildred Bread Street was probably the most important of the eight parishes which have been amalgamated with St Mary-le-Bow since the late seventeenth century. It certainly held the most beautiful Wren church of the outlying parishes (in addition to St Mary-le-Bow itself the parishes of St Augustine Watling Lane, All Hallows Bread Street and St Mildred Bread Street all contained Wren churches). The church of St Mildred was destroyed by enemy action in April and May of 1941. Bread Street runs all the way north from Queen Victoria Street into Cheapside and it marks the north-south axis of the parish of St Mildred. The northern boundary of the parish is more or less at Cannon Street and the southern boundary is at Queen Victoria Street, though a tiny sliver of the parish ran a little further to the south, taking in what is today Huggin Hill. The parish of St Mildred Bread Street, was joined to St Mary-le-Bow after the Second World War.